Discipleship

On campus, what power do we really believe is going to create change in people and set them free? Is it our great proxe stations, or our winning personalities? Is it our campus strategy, or our excellent program? Or is it something else?

My senior year at Maryville College (pronounced Mare-Vul by native Southerners) was a pivotal year for my InterVarsity chapter. The chapter president (my roommate and best friend) set a goal of leaving a legacy on our campus, which seemed like a monumental task. She didn’t rely on herself to get things accomplished and never lost sight of the goal. At the end of our senior year, the unthinkable happened.

As you seek to live out God’s calling on your life, there might be times when you ask yourself a form of this question: What is more important—living a life of holiness or reaching out to friends that don’t know God? Do you want to know Jesus’ answer? It’s “yes.” That is, they go hand in hand.

by: 
Bobby Gross

“Why is this night different from all other nights?” Jewish children will voice this question around Seder tables this week as families celebrate Passover and remember the ancient identity-forming story from Exodus 12-14. Likewise, we do well to ask ourselves as Christians, “Why is this week different from all other weeks? Why is this a holy week?”

In Exodus, God’s people finally have a place to encounter his presence. Does that ancient Tabernacle have any relevance for us today?

by: 
Erin Corry

I have a love/hate relationship with the roller coaster that is chapter planting, and I’m learning that success doesn’t always look the way we expect it to.

by: 
Bobby Gross

The first and most important commandment, Jesus taught, is to love the Lord our God with our whole being—heart, soul, mind and strength. We intuitively get heart and soul (although the distinction between them may be fuzzy): worship, longing, affection, devotion, prayer, etc. And we generally understand that we love God bodily by taking good care of ourselves and using our bodies to do good work and “good works.” But we may be less clear about how to love God with our minds.

The words that Professor Ken Elzinga spoke were not complex, but their impact was profound. As our speaker for the Midwest InterVarsity Faculty Conference at Cedar Campus, Professor Elzinga was giving his final presentation of the event and his main point was simply this, “God is not calling you to success, but rather to obedience.”  

by: 
Jason Jensen

Jesus says, “Apart from me, you can do nothing” (John 15:5). As we seek to develop world-changers in our ministry, we must trust in Jesus, the vine, to produce fruit through our lives.

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