Blogs

by: 
Bruce Hansen

The doctrinal statement of InterVarsity highlights the authority and centrality of Scripture in our movement. It states that we believe in “The unique divine inspiration, entire trustworthiness and authority of the Bible.” This affirmation of the foundational character of Scripture for belief and practice does not discount the importance of Christian tradition in rightly understanding Scripture.

by: 
Steve Hinkle

Incarnation is a hot word these days. It is used to describe ministry among the poor, the outcast, and the disenfranchised with an emphasis on the word “among” rather than “to”. To come alongside, to become one with, to share life with those who for so long have been ministered “to” from a safe distance is an expression of living out the Kingdom of God now even as we await the true return of the king.

by: 
Deb Abbs

When my youngest son, Luke, was diagnosed with autism our family was distressed and confused. But through the years, the Lord has used Luke to teach us all. 

by: 
Bobby Gross

I’ve learned how much the Advent season holds, how it breaks into our lives with images of light and dark, first and last things, watchfulness and longing…. —Kathleen Norris

by: 
Dan Denk

No, Jesus came to do something much greater. Many people today describe Jesus’ ministry and mission in terms of healing. They would say, “Jesus has healed us, and sends us into the world to bring healing.”

Resistance seems futile much of the time, regarding sexual sin or addictions, doesn’t it? I see a piece of creamy, decadent ganache topped cheesecake and I say to myself, I won’t take that cake, I won’t take that cake, I WON’T TAKE THAT CAKE…why am I taking that cake?! 

by: 
Justin Feng

This summer I had the amazing privilege of participating in the first-ever Marketplace Bay Area Urban Project, an InterVarsity summer immersion project geared at exploring the intersection of faith and work. The 10 of us worked at various internships or jobs during the day, and lived together in a house at night.

by: 
Kristen Fu

I spent this summer living in a house in Berkeley, California with nine other people who were complete strangers. While this living situation seems odd and impractical (I already had an apartment as a Berkeley student), I learned that it is often through the unusual and perhaps inconvenient situations that we can more clearly witness God’s goodness.

by: 
Bobby Gross

Jesus’ band of followers already knew a lot about prayer. They were used to praying in their homes and at the synagogue. They were familiar with the amazing range of prayers found in the Hebrew Scriptures, especially the Psalms, so they knew you could approach God in many ways: exuberant celebration, mournful lament, respectful praise, heartfelt thanksgiving, quiet meditation, desperate petition and even troubled argument.

“No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other (Matt 6:24a).” This is an important truth to remember during midterm season.

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